Executive Functions - Building Habits for Heart and Mind

Executive Functions 101 - Keeping positive

Posted by Mollie Shaw on

 Use positive and specific praise.  Be sure to say "Well organized!" "Good focusing today." "I like how you put those papers back neatly." "You worked diligently."  The goal is to try for at least 7 positive and specific acknowledgments of effective executive functioning for every correction.   Here are some ways to support their executive functions: Initiating:  "Hey, you got started without me telling you what to do!  Well done." Organizing: "You emptied the dishwasher with everything in its place. So helpful." Prioritizing:  "I like how you put Math before English today since it was more ___."  Prioritizing: "Which subject should...

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Executive Functions 101- How to Get them Started!

Posted by Mollie Shaw on

Getting students to work independently is a wonderful goal.  But how do you get them to start working, especially if they can find lots of other things to do beforehand?     First, as the parent, you set the atmosphere.  Your positive expectations will set up an environment of success for your student.  When you transition into your schoolwork time, be sure that each new day is a fresh slate with freedom for your student to choose well.   Here are some tips:  1. Ask organizational questions such as:  What materials do you need?  What subject is first?  What is the lesson...

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Executive Functions 101 - Building Habits for Heart and MInd

Posted by Mollie Shaw on

In 2 Corinthians 10:5, Paul admonishes his readers to 'take every thought captive' in order to submit those thoughts to the will of God.  This admonishment came to my mind as I considered ways to help students self-regulate their thoughts and emotions at school.  How can I help my student sort and prioritize random thoughts that occur to him or her during class or homework time? The answer is in the student's self-talk.   Students learn truth from parents, church, teachers and from God's Word.  How a student responds to their own distractions reveals their ability to regulate their own thoughts and...

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